Friday, May 19, 2006

debate about arts journalism

As posted in the Arts Journal, this week 100 alumni of the National Arts Journalism Program gathered in Philadelphia to debate the future of arts journalism. They kept the critical discussion and debate going in this multi-post thread.
One of the big debates was on the presence of "art bloggers" and their ever growing role as a voice of art criticism. Some may argue that with so many bloggers out there, the role of actual paid art journalists may shrink while others take the side of bloggers saying there is much to learn from them.
It is amazing to think about the huge change in the way we get information in the last 10 years or so. We can look up any artist, museum, movement in a matter of seconds and now find an art blog that documents a city's scene in just about every big city across the nation! Is there any down side to being exposed to so much readily available art information and images? I remember back in art school when you were forced to suck in as much art knowledge as possible and there was always one kid who argued "I don't want to look at so many artists because my own art will be influenced and I want to have original ideas". The fact is that nothing is new anymore but can seeing what artists are doing in Berlin...LA....Japan make for one melting pot of art? Not completely, but it is something to think about.

4 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

http://www.johnazoni.com/index.php?func=viewAlbum&albumId=2&albumNameChild=Abstract&parent=1



exhibit A

8:04 PM  
Anonymous MIA said...

For Tonight, Saturday May 20th:

Michigan artists in a Michigan Gallery -- MIA iii: MICHIGANOW

Opening May 20th, Saturday from 6-9pm

THE MICHIGAN INSTITUTE FOR THE ARTS (MIA):
The Michigan Institute for the Arts (MIA) announces its 3rd exhibition at its annex in Pontiac. The selected work of 30 Michigan artists will be exhibited for sale.


The Michigan Institute of Arts (MIA) is located at 7th North Saginaw, Pontiac, MI.


For more information: http://www.detroitmona.com/michigan_institute_for_the_arts1.htm

or, the director, John Cynar at jwcynar@aol.com

10:43 AM  
Anonymous MONA said...

Ann, I hope you can come by the museum early to interview Mariella: she'll installing the exhibit 18, 19 and 20th. So, she can be made available - just let me know.
I'll reserve one of her catalogues for you as well.
Best, Jef @ MONA


mariellaBETTINESCHI
May 20 - June 30

reception:
may 20, saturday
from 6-9pm

wine and cheese reception

An artist is an alchemist. She sifts memories, fables, sand and silt into the maw of the mind and spins threads of gold. The true artist doesn't need a loom or a philosopher's stone to do this; the sibyl herself is that catalyst that weaves sights into visions, sounds into chorales, events into epics. Although purity of heart is to will one thing, there are many kinds of saints, each with a varied path, each with miraculous feats, tortures, and miracles. Some artists are meteoric, glowing spectacularly then vanishing. Other artists grow more slowly, incorporating their experiences like accretions of a shell to gain breadth. Bettineschi's works are more than the sum of plain parts.


regular hours: 12-6pm Thursday through Saturday

MONA is located at 7 N. Saginaw, Pontiac

tel: 248-210-7560

web: detroitmona.com

email: detroitmona@aol.com




















The Italian artist, Mariella Bettineschi's work derives from Arte Povera of the 1960s. At first that seems odd looking at Bettineschi's material sleekness. The Arte Povera generation were informalists who dabbled with detritus and made lyrical assemblies with basic materials. The work was hands on, anti- or non-industrial, crude, and impoverished. They made poetry of ruin and rags, tawdry neon and lead strewn around or positioned in situ. With radical insight they criticized imperialism, capitalism, and the position of institutions. They made you look at the situation and "objects" in a new way.

Bettineschi does that too. Each installation, either outside or in a museum venue, is so succinct that the viewer subtly becomes aware of the artist's guiding. When you see her sources, they are as direct as the previous generation. Though she now uses digital photography, printers and computer manipulation, this technology is not beyond the grasp of most viewers; we see mercantile windows done in the same occupational manner daily. Such technology is quite common today. It is the nature of the imagery, not its modus, that is different.

An artist is an alchemist. She sifts memories, fables, sand and silt into the maw of the mind and spins threads of gold. The true artist doesn't need a loom or a philosopher's stone to do this; the sibyl herself is that catalyst that weaves sights into visions, sounds into chorales, events into epics. Although purity of heart is to will one thing, there are many kinds of saints, each with a varied path, each with miraculous feats, tortures, and miracles. Some artists are meteoric, glowing spectacularly then vanishing. Other artists grow more slowly, incorporating their experiences like accretions of a shell to gain breadth. Her works are more than the sum of plain parts.

10:47 AM  
Blogger John Azoni said...

anon-

please explain what you mean by that. Not that I take offense to it, because really I don't know what you're trying to get across, but I would appreciate a more in depth response to my work.

10:13 PM  

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